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All for the Gram

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All for the Gram

Photos by Ally Scheve, Angie Cummings and Chayla Cummings

Photos by Ally Scheve, Angie Cummings and Chayla Cummings

Photos by Ally Scheve, Angie Cummings and Chayla Cummings

Photos by Ally Scheve, Angie Cummings and Chayla Cummings

Charlotte Cheng

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Whether it is a vibrant image of food, fashion or nature, an aesthetically pleasing Instagram feed is what teenagers and young adults around the world strive for. They hope to  convey the message that they are leading a perfect life.

However, a new type of desirable photo has taken the Instagram world by storm: pop-up museums, which are exhibitions that take place in locations temporarily.

Some of the popular pop-ups have included the Color Factory, Museum of Ice Cream and 29 Rooms. All of these museums are promoted through social media and sell a limited number of tickets to make the experience more exclusive.

The Color Factory and the Museum of Ice Cream have been the highly-anticipated pop-up museums for people living in the Bay Area. Both are located in San Francisco and their tickets were sold out in a matter of hours.

Two C Mag staffers visited the Museum of Ice Cream on October 6th to see what the hype was about. First, however, they needed to buy tickets. After waking up early on a day off from school, waiting in a 45 minute online queue and spending $72, the two tickets were theirs.

When the date finally arrived eight weeks after purchasing the tickets, the two girls entered the pastel pink doors of the museum full of sweet treats. While meandering through the museum, there were plenty of showrooms with different exhibits. The rooms included a pool filled with sprinkles that museum goers could jump into, a swing-set surrounded by hanging bananas and a room where mochi and cotton candy were given to visitors as a treat.

The culinary aesthetic characterizing many pop-up museums has received critique, some believing that these museums do not exhibit real art. Despite the debate, it is evident that at every pop-up museum there is an abundance of iPhone, polaroid and Nikon cameras. People take dozens of photos in front of each exhibit, hoping to capture the “perfect picture” for their Instagram feed.

Pop-up museums have seemingly become more about the exclusive pictures that people can boast about on social media than the actual experience itself. The promise of pretty photo-ops that instill envy in followers is seemingly at the heart of these pop-ups.

There is a stigma in society today of putting out the perfect image of yourself on social media. When you have a feed that appeals to people, it makes them want to follow you. When the heart icon pops up there is a feeling of satisfaction because your followers like what they see.

To be frankly honest, I am guilty of all of this. My Instagram is like a cover for who I am. Before people get to know me, they are able to see my feed. They make judgements based off of the things I post and the amount of followers I have.

Since these pop-ups are considered more “exclusive” there is a sense of superiority over those who aren’t able to go. People pay up to $100 to go to these museums, but for what? An Instagram picture?